Dienstag, 3. Mai 2011

Okonomiyaki





















Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き) is a Japanese savoury pancake containing a variety of ingredients. The name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning "what you like" or "what you want", and yaki meaning "grilled" or "cooked" (c.f. yakitori and yakisoba). Okonomiyaki is mainly associated with Kansai or Hiroshima areas of Japan, but is widely available throughout the country. Toppings and batters tend to vary according to region.

Kansai area

Kansai- or Osaka-style okonomiyaki is the predominant version of the dish, found throughout most of Japan. The batter is made of flour, grated yam, water or dashi, eggs and shredded cabbage, and usually contains other ingredients such as green onion, meat (generally pork or bacon), octopus, squid, shrimp, vegetables, kimchi, mochi or cheese. Okonomiyaki is sometimes compared to an omelette or a pancake and may be referred to as "a Japanese pancake" or even "Osaka soul food".
Some okonomiyaki restaurants are grill-it-yourself establishments, where the server produces a bowl of raw ingredients that the customer mixes and grills at tables fitted with teppan, or special hotplates. They may also have a diner-style counter where the cook prepares the dish in front of the customers.
In Osaka (the largest city in the Kansai region), where this dish is said to have originated, okonomiyaki is prepared much like a pancake. The batter and other ingredients are fried on both sides on either a teppan or a pan using metal spatulas that are later used to slice the dish when it has finished cooking. Cooked okonomiyaki is topped with ingredients that include otafuku/okonomiyaki sauce (similar to Worcestershire sauce but thicker and sweeter), aonori (seaweed flakes), katsuobushi (bonito flakes), Japanese mayonnaise, and pickled ginger (beni shoga).

Variants

When served with a layer of fried noodles (either yakisoba or udon), the resulting dish is called modanyaki (モダン焼き) "modern yaki".
Negiyaki (ねぎ焼き) is a thinner variation of okonomiyaki made with a great deal of scallions; compare Korean pajeon and Chinese green onion pancakes.

Kommentare:

  1. dude, i am drooling all over my keyboard right now! looks delicious.

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  2. I ate that one time. Not bad at all.

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  3. I've never tried it, looks delicious!

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  4. It doesn't look like my sort of thing but I'll look for these on the take-away menu ;)

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  5. Looks great, I might try it sometime!

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  6. Ahhhhh, I hate when I stumble across delicious looking food while im hungry. That looks sooo good.

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  7. Looks really good man. It's a shame that the only "Japanese" restaurants around here are "sushi" restaurants.

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  8. Dieser Kommentar wurde vom Autor entfernt.

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  9. That might be the most delicious looking food. At least it doesn't taunt me in 3D right?

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  10. The doesn't look delicious, but for some reason I still want to eat it. Weird.

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  11. I heard something about this the other day on I think the Food Network! Sounds amazing!!

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  12. Doesn't look too appetizing to me, but I'd try it once for curiosity's sake.

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  13. That just made me so very hungry.

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  14. Not like any pancake I've ever seen. Strangely appetizing.

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  15. Looks like a Japanese pizza if you ask me...I didn't have any idea other cultures besides Italians had developed a pizza-esque dish. Great post.

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  16. With shrimp! looks tasty but also like a big mess hehe

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  17. Looks very interesting....and very fattening haha good post

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  18. Awesome blog! I enjoy reading it! You got yourself a new follower bra!

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  19. Looks and sounds really nice man, making me hungry just sitting here :)

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